Sitesearch

Stakeholders

Navigation

Choose glossary language

 

arable land

Wikipedia definition:

In geography and agriculture, arable land is land that can be used for growing crops. It includes all land under annual crops (double-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or market and kitchen gardens and land temporarily fallow (less than five years). Abandoned land resulting from shifting cultivation is not included in this category. Data for arable land are not meant to indicate the amount of land that is potentially cultivable. Arable land is a category of agricultural land, which, according to Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO) definition, additionally includes land under permanent or perennial crops, such as fruit plantations, as well as permanent pastures, for grazing of livestock. In 2008, the world's total arable land amounted to 13,805,153 km², and 48,836,976 km² was classified as "agricultural land. " Although constrained by land mass and topology, the amount of arable land, both regionally and globally, fluctuates due to human and climatic factors such as irrigation, deforestation, desertification, terracing, landfill, and urban sprawl. Researchers study the impact of these changes on food production. The most productive portion of arable land is that from sediments left by rivers and the sea in geological times. In modern times, rivers do not generally flood as often in areas employing flood control.

Source: dbpedia

glossary info

How to Search Terms

Please enter a search term or choose a letter to navigate the glossary and to find definitions. This glossary aims to facilitate collaboration on the development of ambitious energy efficiency measures by clarifying definitions and highlighting common terminology. Definitions have been collected from trusted sources. It intended to expand this glossary in the future to include a wiki ensuring a truly collaborative process. If you contribute to this glossary please contact use at: info@reegle.info

Understanding Relations

The relation browser enables the user to see the relations between terms.

Below is an explanation of the letters that appear on the arrows in the relation browser

C = Has Concept Scheme. Points to a concept scheme in the reegle glossary. Concept schemes provide the main categories of the reegleglossary.
T = Has Top Concept. Points to a top concept in the reegleglossary. Top Concepts are the top level concepts in a concept scheme.
N = Has Narrower. Points to a narrower concept of the selected concept